Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, Poison Sumac

*Practice update COVID-19 as of 4/28/2020

 

 

Dear Patient, 

 

I hope that you and your family are staying healthy in these trying times.  I have been closely monitoring the developments of COVID-19 in our community and across the country.  I am encouraged by the decline in new cases in our community and I am comfortable cautiously reopening our practice as of Friday, May 1st.  In an effort to reduce the spread of COVID-19, I have implemented safety measures following the guidelines of the American Academy of Dermatology. 

Prior to a scheduled appointment, a Sun Valley Skin Center staff member will contact the patient and ask if they, or someone they have been in close contact with, are experiencing symptoms related to COVID-19.  A patient who is experiencing these symptoms will be asked to reschedule their appointment until the symptoms have resolved.  Patients will be asked to wear a mask when they enter the practice.  If a patient does not have a mask, we will request that they call the practice from the parking lot and a staff member will bring a mask to the patient.  Once patients enter the building, a staff member will immediately escort them into an exam room that has had all surfaces sterilized.  All Sun Valley Skin Center staff members will be wearing gloves and masks at all times.  Visits that can be rendered via telemedicine will continue to be conducted over our telemedicine platform for at least the month of May in an effort to reduce the amount of people in the office. 

I sincerely appreciate your participation in these efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19 in our community.  I ask that patients not bring children, friends or loved ones to their appointment.  I have been impressed with our community’s response to reduce the spread of COVID-19.  I think that it is important that we all remain vigilant and continue to adhere to public health guidelines to further reduce the spread of COVID-19. 

I thank you for the support of our practice and look forward to seeing you in the practice or virtually through telemedicine. 

Stay safe.  Stay healthy.

 

Sincerely,

Lindie Borton, MD

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac are plants that produce an oil (urushiol) that causes an allergic reaction among humans. The inflammation is a reaction to contact with any part of the plant, which leads to burning, itching, redness and blisters. The inflammation is a form of contact dermatitis, an allergic reaction to an allergen that comes into direct contact with the skin. It is not contagious. Poison ivy is more prevalent in the eastern part of the country; poison oak is more prevalent in the southeastern part of the country.

Poison ivy is characterized by red, itchy bumps and blisters that appear in the area that came into contact with the plant. The rash begins one to two days after exposure. The rash first appears in curved lines and will clear up on its own in 14 to 21 days.

Treatment for poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac is designed to relieve the itching and may include oral antihistamines and cortisone creams (either over-the-counter or prescription). These treatments need to be applied before blisters appear or after the blisters have dried up to be effective. In severe cases, oral steroids, such as prednisone, may be prescribed.

The best form of prevention is to recognize and avoid contact with the plants. This can be difficult because these plants tend to grow around other vegetation. These three poison plants can be distinguished by their classic three-leaf formation. To avoid contact with these plants, wear long sleeves and pants when hiking outdoors and keep to the trails. Tuck the ends of your sleeves into gloves and the bottom of your pants into socks so that no area of skin on your arms or legs is exposed. If you think you have come into contact with a poison plant, wash the area of skin with cool water as quickly as possible to help limit the reaction. Also, wash the clothing you were wearing immediately after exposure.